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Retailer announces plans to rebuild

cubkindCUB and its franchise partner Jerry’s Foods announced its commitment to the Minneapolis community to rebuild its Broadway Avenue and Lake Street stores, both of which are owned by Jerry’s Foods. CUB also announced that while those two locations remain closed, CUB plans to open temporary community stores at each location to help address the food insecurity issues in these Minneapolis neighborhoods. CUB expects the community store at Lake Street to be open by July 8 and the Broadway location later in July. Each store will be approximately 13,000 square feet in size and will offer key items from all parts of the store, including fresh produce, meat, dairy, and best-selling grocery items at the same everyday prices as a traditional CUB store. The stores will also support the needs of pharmacy customers and will sell the most popular over-the-counter medicines.

For customers wanting to shop at a traditional, full-size grocery store, CUB is launching free, dedicated bus service from its Broadway and Lake Street stores to alternative CUB stores in the area. Customers picked up from the CUB Broadway location will be transported to the CUB Crystal store located at 5301 36th Avenue N. Customers picked up from the CUB Lake Street location will be transported to the CUB Quarry store located at 1540 New Brighton Blvd. The free coach bus service will start today and run from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily with pickups from the Broadway and Lake Street stores starting each hour, on the hour, and drop off occurring on the half hour. Each bus will have a set of social distancing practices in place, is limited to 20 riders per bus, and will not make stops between stores.

“CUB is actively involved in our communities and it is our responsibility to roll-up our sleeves and find solutions to help meet the needs of our neighbors, family, and friends while our Broadway and Lake Street stores are under construction,” said Mike Stigers, CUB CEO. “We know that even though these two stores are closed, life events, activities, and special occasions continue to take place and the community needs its neighborhood grocer to be there providing access to essential food and grocery items. We’re proud to offer a variety of options for customers to shop with CUB.”

To complement the community stores and coach bus service, CUB will also offer free grocery pickup at the Broadway and Lake Street stores for orders placed online. As always, customers can continue to order groceries online and have them delivered to their home or office. Customers placing orders online for either pickup or delivery can choose from a full selection of store products.

As CUB prepares for the rebuild and reopening of its Broadway and Lake Street stores, the company is also planning to host a couple community input sessions, which CUB hopes will provide local residents an opportunity to share their ideas and suggestions for what they hope the new CUB stores will bring to the neighborhood. Additional information on these listening forums and timelines for the reopening of the Broadway and Lake Street stores will be forthcoming.

“The work we’re doing to support these areas couldn’t be accomplished without the support of the entire Jerry’s Foods team, who are the franchise owners of the CUB Broadway and Lake Street stores. Their dedication to the local community is paramount in helping bring these community stores to life,” said Stigers. “As Minnesota’s hometown grocer, CUB has been an integral part of this state’s landscape for over 50 years and we are fully committed to these communities, reopening our stores, and being a part of these great neighborhoods once again.”

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